Dan Margulis Applied Color Theory - Color Reading Suggestions

From: "Ron Bean", rbean@execpc.com
Date: Mon, Oct 25, 1999, 9:44 PM
RE: Re: recommended reading

Dan Margulis writes:

>The best books on color don't date. I'd recommend Billmeyer and Saltzman,
>Principles of Color Technology, and Yule, Principles of Color Reproduction.

>For pure reading pleasure, without the arithmetic, go back a few years and
>read
> The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci
> Sargent, The Enjoyment and Use of Color
> Anything by Ansel Adams
>and the best book on color ever written,
> Rood, Modern Chromatics

Thanks for posting this. I was able to find all of them at the library (including Billmeyer's book, which the catalog listed as "missing" even though it was on the shelf :-).

Yule's book as a lot of cool stuff about how they did things before scanners were invented (and also about the early scanners).

I'd also recommend "Creative Color" by Faber Birren. It's about painting rather than printing, but I found it very interesting (most bookstores seem to have it, in the art section).


From: Dan Margulis
Date: Mon, Oct 25, 1999, 11:07 PM
RE: Re: recommended reading

Ron writes:

>>I'd also recommend "Creative Color" by Faber Birren. It's about painting rather than printing, but I found it very interesting (most bookstores seem to have it, in the art section).>>

Yeah, I should have had that on the list. Birren was also fairly actively involved in republishing a lot of color stuff from the past, including Rood's book and also those of Chevreul and Itten, which I could personally do without.

All of these writers were working with limited knowledge. Rood wrote when photography had just been invented, and it was still in its infancy when Birren was writing. Naturally, they got a few things wrong. What continues to amaze is how much they got right.

Leonardo wrote:

"Colors that lie in shadow display less variety as the shadows are in which they lie get deeper. One can observe this effect by looking from an open space into the doorways of dark and shadowy churches, where the pictures, although they are painted in various colors, all seem to be of uniform darkness.
"Therefore, if the distance is big enough, all the shadows of different colors will appear of the same luminosity."

Five hundred years later, the meaning of this is still unclear to many of those who bleat about why we need to match the art.

Dan Margulis




From: Andrew Engelhardt
Date: Wed, Nov 24, 1999, 6:14 PM
RE: reference books
Hi All, just wondering if anyone knows of or can recommend some good books on prepress and the printing process in general. I've got Dan's book which is excellent but I'd like to learn more about the printing process, film output, platemaking etc. I've been scouring local technical book stores but there seems to be a distinct lack of material on these subjects. I'm aware of a couple of books by Frank Romano but that's about it. Are there any textbooks used in colleges with printing/prepress programs? Any suggestions appreciated. Thanks.

Andrew Engelhardt
Marketing Dept.,
London Drugs Ltd.,
12831 Horseshoe Place
Richmond B.C. Canada V7A 4X5
Ph.(604) 272-7602


From: Dan Margulis
Date: Thu, Nov 25, 1999, 12:27 PM
RE: reference books

Andrew Engelhardt writes:

>>Hi All, just wondering if anyone knows of or can recommend some good books on prepress and the printing process in general. I've got Dan's book which is excellent but I'd like to learn more about the printing process, film output, platemaking etc. I've been scouring local technical book stores but there seems to be a distinct lack of material on these subjects. I'm aware of a couple of books by Frank Romano but that's about it. Are there any textbooks used in colleges with printing/prepress programs? Any suggestions appreciated. Thanks.>>

Such books are basically nonexistent, for several reasons. First, the market for them is small; second, the number of people qualified to write them is even smaller; third, technology is changing so fast that anything written five years ago is going to be largely obsolete today.

The best general intro to the field is probably International Paper's "Pocket Pal: A Graphic Arts Production Handbook" which is available free from various sources. Beyond that, the best source material pops up in articles, technical papers, and vendor publications. The problem is, of course, that for every good one there are about 25 that aren't.

As to what the colleges are doing, I *think* they are basically using handouts of such potpourri. The professor finds articles that he thinks pertain and puts them together in some kind of binder. A lot of my own articles are used in this way.

Among vendor-supplied materials, Agfa has a very nice printed series on prepress, and X-Rite has an excellent introduction to color available in PDF format.

Dan Margulis


From: Bill Carberry
Date: Wed, Nov 24, 1999, 8:31 PM
RE: Re: reference books

Andrew Engelhardt wrote:

> Hi All, just wondering if anyone knows of or can recommend some good > books on prepress and the printing process in general.

Andrew,

If you have a recent copy of Adobe PageMaker, you'll find a decent "Commercial Printing Guide" inside.

Best regards,
Bill Carberry
Carberry Consulting
Atlanta, GA
http://carberry.home.mindspring.com


From: Steve Upton, Date: Wed, Nov 24, 1999, 11:39 PM
RE: Re: reference books

>Hi All, just wondering if anyone knows of or can recommend some
>good books on prepress and the printing process in general.

I would look at the GATF publications.

http://www.gatf.org/

Regards,

Steve Upton

+--------------------------------------------------+
Steve Upton
upton@chromix.com

CHROMiX / Profile Central

www.chromix.com www.profilecentral.com
+--------------------------------------------------+


From: "Ron Bean", rbean@execpc.com
Date: Thu, Nov 25, 1999, 6:14 PM
RE: Re: reference books

Andrew Engelhardt writes:

>Hi All, just wondering if anyone knows of or can recommend some good books
>on prepress and the printing process in general. I've got Dan's book which
>is excellent but I'd like to learn more about the printing process, film
>output, platemaking etc. I've been scouring local technical book stores but
>there seems to be a distinct lack of material on these subjects. I'm aware
>of a couple of books by Frank Romano but that's about it. Are there any
>textbooks used in colleges with printing/prepress programs? Any suggestions
>appreciated. Thanks.

If you want to know what technical schools use for textbooks, go to one and sneak into their bookstore :-).

[If you dress like a student, they'll assume you are one -- the average age of students at tech schools is 33, and they'll usually take anyone's credit card.]

The books from GATF aren't a bad place to start, but they're expensive and their titles are sometimes a little misleading. You may be able to find some of them in libraries (too bad most card catalogs don't let you search by publisher :-).

Sometimes you'll find old textbooks in used bookstores. They tend to describe obsolete equipment, but presses haven't changed much, and platemaking with imagesetter film is the same as it was with camera film. Imposition with a computer isn't really any different than with film either.

Books on electronic prepress tend to veer off into stuff about servers and zip disks and modems, which anyone with any computer experience will already know about. For output to an imagesetter (or platesetter) you might learn more by reading an operator's manual from a RIP, but I don't know where you'd find one if you're not in the business.


From: John Sweeney
Date: Sat, Nov 27, 1999, 9:26 PM
RE: Re: reference books

In a message dated 11/24/99 6:15:51 PM Eastern Standard Time, aengelhardt@londondrugs.com writes:

> Are there any
> textbooks used in colleges with printing/prepress programs? Any suggestions
> appreciated. Thanks.

I think the GATFPress is the best resource today for technical references -- GATF publishes a number of Frank Romano's titles, including the Enclyclopedia of the Graphic Arts.

www.gatf.org
or request a printed catalog: info@gatf.org

John Sweeney
Graphics Microsystems, Inc.


From: John Gallagher
Date: Mon, Nov 29, 1999, 10:21 AM
RE: Re: reference books

Andrew Engelhardt writes:

>>>Hi All, just wondering if anyone knows of or can recommend some good
>books
>on prepress and the printing process in general.

"Getting It Printed" , by Beach and Kenly is a good general intro designed for new print buyers but with good info on printing processes beyond just electronic prepress. The book is designed for novice print buyers. GATF puts out a good catalog of books and printed material on printing. I'd call them at (412) 741-6860 and request a copy of their PIA/GATF Publications Catalog.

The IP Pocket Pal previously recommended is also good. Good Luck!

John G.




From: James Foster
Date: Wed, Dec 19, 2001, 6:59 PM
RE: [colortheory] Good books for Colour Theory

I am relatively new to the Colour Theory/Science area but have been working within the print industry for about 2 years now. I am looking at getting more into the nitty gritty of colour science and Colour Theory as a general topic rather than specifying to one particular product.

Can anyone out there recommend any good books to start off with? Also, are there any industry certifications you can achieve?

Many thanks,

Happy Xmas.

James Foster
--
Technical Account Manager
Image Technologies Developments


From: Andrew Engelhardt
Date: Thu, Dec 20, 2001, 4:35 PM
RE: RE: [colortheory] Good books for Colour Theory

Lots of books listed at http://www.gatf.org/

Andrew Engelhardt
Digital Prepress & Imaging
Marketing Dept.
London Drugs Ltd.
(604) 272-7602


From: Ron Bean
Date: Thu, Dec 20, 2001, 1:30 PM
RE: Re: [colortheory] Good books for Colour Theory

James Foster writes:

>Can anyone out there recommend any good books to start off with?

We had a thread about this in October of '99, is it in the archives?

These are mostly Dan's suggestions from that thread, plus a couple of mine:

Principles of Color Technology, by Fred Billmeyer & Max Saltzman (Lots of math, but you can skip that part and still get a lot out of it. Big emphasis on metamerism. Still in print but expensive. Highly recommended.)

Creative Color by Faber Birren (Written for painters but helped me to understand some things. Still in print, and dirt cheap :-)

The Reproduction of Color, by R. Hunt (I seem to recall that Dan said to take this one with a grain of salt, but there is some good stuff in there. Mostly about photography and television, but also talks about printing. Hunt worked for Kodak Research Labs in Harrow, England.)

Modern Chromatics by Ogden Rood (Dan's favorite book about color)

Principles of Color Reproduction, by J. Yule (A highly technical book about color halftones, written when analog drum scanners were just coming into use. Read this if you want to understand how RGB->CMYK separations are made. Again, you can skip the heavy math and still get a lot out of it. Yule worked for Kodak Research Labs in Rochester NY.)

A Half Century of Color, by Louis Sipley (Very cool book about the history of color printing from 1900 to 1951, including some actual samples bound into the book.)

The Enjoyment and Use of Color by Sargent
The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci
Anything by Ansel Adams (Other suggestions from Dan, I haven't read these so I can't comment.)

Almost all of these are out of print, so try a library first. I've also had some luck with abebooks.com

>Also, are there any industry certifications you can achieve?

Not that I know of. I'm a little skeptical about the value of certifications in general, but that's another topic.


From: "Broudy, David
Date: Thu, Dec 20, 2001, 1:30 PM
RE: RE: [colortheory] Good books for Colour Theory

John A. C. Yule's _Principles of Color Reproduction_ was recently re-issued by GATF Press (ISBN: 0-88362-222-X). it is difficult material and some of it is very dated (e.g. the stuff about photomechanical separations) but the science behind it is still very appplicable to color repro. an amazon.com search would probably turn up dozens of more general color science/theory books.

I don't know of any industry certifications other than the GATF ColorSync Registry and I'm not that familiar with it.

--
David Broudy
Jostens R&D
11300 Rupp Drive
Burnsville, MN 55337
952.882.3617


From: "SUSAN & JOHN OPITZ", jas10286@earthlink.net
Date: Thu, Dec 20, 2001, 1:29 PM
RE: [colortheory] RE: Good books for color theory

Adding to what others have posted:

Mr. Dan Margulis. His articles at https://www.ledet.com/margulis/articles.html

Mr. Chris Murphy. No book published. His web site at http://www.colorremedies.com/index.html
He's into color management as well. Geared more towards Mac users.

John Opitz


From: "Maris V. Lidaka, Sr.", mlidaka@ameritech.net
Date: Thu, Dec 20, 2001, 6:35 AM
RE: Re: [colortheory] Good books for Colour Theory

I don't know of a book on it but there is a wealth of information at Andrew Rodney's The Digital Dog website at http://www.digitaldog.net/tips.html and also at the Adobe website.

Maris Lidaka Sr


From: "Maris V. Lidaka, Sr.", mlidaka@ameritech.net
RE: Re: [colortheory] Good books for Colour Theory

Point well taken - I took your (James's) original question re Color Theory as dealing with color management, and Andrew Rodney 's website is the one for that.

When it comes to color correction of images, Dan Margulis is and has been for years THE person for that - definitely buy and read his book. It's the first one I read when I started in this field a year or so ago.

Maris Lidaka Sr

----- Original Message -----
From: "gary roushkolb"
To: "Maris V. Lidaka, Sr."
Sent: Wednesday, December 19, 2001 10:12 PM
Subject: Re: [colortheory] Good books for Colour Theory

| Be sure and check Dan Margulis "Professional Photoshop". If you want
| "Credos" attend his class and and just have him compliment something you
| corrected, May not be official but it really helps your self confidence the
| next impossible job that comes in.
| Gary Roushkolb, Donlevy Lithograph Wichita, Kansas


From: David.Clark@Walsworth.com, David.Clark@Walsworth.com
Date: Fri, Dec 21, 2001, 10:25 AM
RE: [colortheory] Re:Books

"Colorist", by Shigenobu Kobayayashi. It's a fascinating book which goes into great detail on the author's method for building color palettes. He has another book "Image Color Scale" which rates colors by impact.

If you just want to copy other people, the "color harmony" type books are OK but this guy has an amazing amount of original thinking and technique.

David Clark


From: Richard Reader
Date: Sat, Dec 15, 2001, 10:17 AM
RE: [colortheory] Books for newbie

I am an emerging professional photographer. I have been dabbling in digital photography for some time, but I am only now realizing how little I know about printing and prepress issues. This is a great forum, but I am wondering whether anyone can recommend any books that give overviews of some of the issues that are discussed here.

Thanks,
Richard Reader


From: Todd Flashner
Date: Sat, Dec 15, 2001, 2:23 PM
RE: Re: [colortheory] Books for newbie

on 12/14/01 5:38 PM, Richard Reader wrote:

> I am an emerging professional photographer. I have been dabbling in
> digital photography for some time, but I am only now realizing how
> little I know about printing and prepress issues. This is a great
> forum, but I am wondering whether anyone can recommend any books that
> give overviews of some of the issues that are discussed here.

Professional Photoshop 6, by Dan Margulis, is "required reading" for this list.

Todd Flashner

Adobe Photoshop training classes are taught in the US by Sterling Ledet & Associates, Inc.